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#DevOpsFriday5 Round-Up 4: What Attributes Constitute a Culture Embracing DevOps?

Posted by Priyanka Jain on Fri, Jun 3, 2016 @ 17:06 pm

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This week we look at our favourite answers for our fourth #DevOpsFriday5 question - What attributes constitute a culture embracing DevOps?

What Attributes Constitute a Culture Embracing DevOps?

 

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“Culture is not DevOps.  Culture is a big word and it is the way the people in an organisation allow for the use of technology to create great things for the use by customers.  I prefer the word climate when applied to DevOps as mentioned by Stephen Parry.  In IT we can begin to change the climate of people interfacing and then using automation without fear of job loss.  This climate then begins to permeate the whole spectrum of an organisation and hopefully becomes its culture.” Daniel Breston

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“No finger pointing, no prima donnas, recognizing that everyone’s contribution is important and that it is the total success of the team that determines our success.  These are the cultural values I would look for.” Alan Shimel

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“The fundamental cultural attribute for successful DevOps environments is people across all functions involved in the development/delivery pipeline continuously work together to reduce process friction.  Ironically to accomplish this continuously often result in personal stress and friction because everyone is constantly trying to root out weak links in the pipeline.  So another key attribute in successful DevOps cultures is leadership and human resources practices that encourage and support staff practices that support reducing process friction yet are sensitive to helping staff that experience personal friction.” Marc Hornbeek

keith_watson-2.jpg“Improved understanding in development of stability required by operations/live applications Improved understanding by operations teams of need for agility and speed of infrastructure and applications deployment required by agile development teams Willingness to collaborate between teams Willingness to overcome the politics between teams Aware of need for factory to deliver solutions rather than just project specific goals People willing to be boundary spanners e.g. developers who now have an interest in operations/infrastructure provision and sysadm operations who want to code and understand impact of operations/infrastructure provision on the speed of SDLC.”  Keith Watson

Lori_MacVittie.jpg“Improved understanding in development of stability required by operations/live applications Improved understanding by operations teams of need for agility and speed of infrastructure and applications deployment required by agile development teams Willingness to collaborate between teams Willingness to overcome the politics between teams Aware of need for factory to deliver solutions rather than just project specific goals People willing to be boundary spanners e.g. developers who now have an interest in operations/infrastructure provision and sysadm operations who want to code and understand impact of operations/infrastructure provision on the speed of SDLC.” Lori MacVittie

DW_1-2.jpg“All for one, and one for all. It is a culture of continuous innovation. It is one that blamelessly looks at past approaches in an effort to improve them. It is one that cheers people on. It is one that explores new angles through experimentation. It is open. And it is one where people have fun.” Derek E. Weeks

 

 

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A flattened organisational structure shows a company that embraces DevOps. When I was a developer on safety critical, real-time embedded systems products in the 1990's I had a project manager who made sure everyone understood the architecture of the system being developed. There were no isolated silo's, and everyone knew where their specific part of the jigsaw fitted in. The consequence of this was great awareness and better engagement to solve problems. The DevOps culture should be similar to that in that everyone is aware of the scope and architecture of the application under development and everyone understands the broad challenges of business analysis, requirements, development and deployment. Breaking down silo's and ensuring there is no 'throwing content over the wall' to the next team is a sign of a DevOps culture. If you have little awareness of what your peers are doing you will throw applications and problems over the wall to them. Mark Roberts  

medium.jpgThe ability to critically examine the boundary judgements that were used to put in place the current Architecture, Security, Development, Operations and IT Service management practices. Critical Systems Heuristics (Ulrich) is great for this especially to create a platform on which to start the collaborative discussions required to emancipate staff from siloed or otherwise poorly designed management systems. A reflective organisation committed to ongoing learning (Senge). Groups of people, Dev, Ops, ITIL people, Security, Architecture, Business People, all with different worldviews and/or perspectives but willing and able to try to understand each others points of view and then seek accommodations, if not consensus. Strategy making within the context of DevOps becomes a collaborative activity that permeates through all the levels of the organisation. Patrick Hyland

 

Want to participate in the next round of #DevOpsFriday5 with a new set of questions? Do that here.

 

Topics: DevOpstastic, #DevOpsFriday5, DevOps